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A solenoid is switch, it offers no circuit protection. The only reason to use a solenoid is so anything wired to your fuse box will only have power when the solenoid is ON.
There are circuit breakers that can be used like switch, but you have to remember to turn them OFF at the end of each use.
I would use a circuit breaker to protect the system (battery to fuse box) and solenoid (continuous duty) if there is anything you plan to hook to the fuse box that could be left ON (which would drain the battery)
 

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I would suggest you use a fuse. It is the simplest of all the other options. Throw a couple spares in the glove box. If you develop more knowledge and skill and start "getting into" electrical wiring, you can easily convert to one of the more sophisticated circuit protection methods. When a "main fuse blows", it is generally because the insulation on the wire (positive) between the battery and fuse box has been rubbed away on a metal frame member, bracket, bulkhead, etc. It is called a "dead short". These are all things that are attached to the negative (ground) side of the battery. It is just like you laid a screwdriver across both battery terminals at the same time. Lots of power and a spark or 4 with some smoke thrown in.

This is a good time to remember to ALWAYS-ALWAYS-ALWAYS remove the negative battery terminal first and replace it last. That way, if the wrench you are using touches a metal bracket and the Positive (+) battery terminal at the same time, there is no arching and you don't soil yourself. Taking your watch and rings off when working with electricity is a no brainer and also the sign of a pro.
 

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I used a100 amp fuse coming off my secondary battery to protect the 8 AWG wire to the up front fuse box. Don't care if i drain the secondary battery and the redarc isolator allows me to connect a solar panel that charges both batteries if needed.
 

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I would suggest you use a fuse. It is the simplest of all the other options. Throw a couple spares in the glove box. If you develop more knowledge and skill and start "getting into" electrical wiring, you can easily convert to one of the more sophisticated circuit protection methods. When a "main fuse blows", it is generally because the insulation on the wire (positive) between the battery and fuse box has been rubbed away on a metal frame member, bracket, bulkhead, etc. It is called a "dead short". These are all things that are attached to the negative (ground) side of the battery. It is just like you laid a screwdriver across both battery terminals at the same time. Lots of power and a spark or 4 with some smoke thrown in.

This is a good time to remember to ALWAYS-ALWAYS-ALWAYS remove the negative battery terminal first and replace it last. That way, if the wrench you are using touches a metal bracket and the Positive (+) battery terminal at the same time, there is no arching and you don't soil yourself. Taking your watch and rings off when working with electricity is a no brainer and also the sign of a pro.
I disagree that "These are things that are attached to the negative (ground) side of the battery." Should be the positive side.
 

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"I disagree that "These are things that are attached to the negative (ground) side of the battery." Should be the positive side."....Zebrafive

Every electrical component on the vehicle is connected to both the positive and negative sides of the battery. It is called a complete circuit. Think of the word "circuit" to mean circle. If not, the component will not work. The standard in the transportation industry is what is called a one wire circuit. The metal frame and metal body, which are attached to the negative terminal on the battery, are capable of acting like a wire. This allows the manufacturers to save weight, materials, labor and money. Pop the hood on your internal combustion engine car, look at the battery terminal marked NEG or (-) and you will see the heavy wire connected to it travels a short distance and bolts directly to the engine block and the frame (or unibody). The whole body and frame is one giant negative wire. You can wire in a light by running a fused and switched positive wire to the light and then run a short piece of wire from the remaining connection on the light socket to the metal frame, body or structural support of the vehicle. Turn the switch "on" and electricity has a complete circuit from the battery thru the fuse, thru the switch, thru the light, thru the body or frame and back to the negative terminal on the battery and the light glows. I sure wish I had the ability to include a sketch here.

I stand by my initial statement.
 

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My dealer installed mine. Pretty straight forward - they pulled a hot cable from the battery through the conduit up to the front compartment and connected it there. 10 blade connectors with fuses, I have a common ground on the frame not too far from it that everything is grounded to. Makes hooking things up pretty easy, a lot less wire and a lot less time fishing things through, over and around.
Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Automotive battery Trunk Electrical wiring
 

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"I disagree that "These are things that are attached to the negative (ground) side of the battery." Should be the positive side."....Zebrafive

Every electrical component on the vehicle is connected to both the positive and negative sides of the battery. It is called a complete circuit. Think of the word "circuit" to mean circle. If not, the component will not work. The standard in the transportation industry is what is called a one wire circuit. The metal frame and metal body, which are attached to the negative terminal on the battery, are capable of acting like a wire. This allows the manufacturers to save weight, materials, labor and money. Pop the hood on your internal combustion engine car, look at the battery terminal marked NEG or (-) and you will see the heavy wire connected to it travels a short distance and bolts directly to the engine block and the frame (or unibody). The whole body and frame is one giant negative wire. You can wire in a light by running a fused and switched positive wire to the light and then run a short piece of wire from the remaining connection on the light socket to the metal frame, body or structural support of the vehicle. Turn the switch "on" and electricity has a complete circuit from the battery thru the fuse, thru the switch, thru the light, thru the body or frame and back to the negative terminal on the battery and the light glows. I sure wish I had the ability to include a sketch here.

I stand by my initial statement.
I am saying I disagree with attaching a fuse or circuit breaker to the negative side of the battery, instead of the positive side. I never said circuits do not have/need a ground.
You said "these things are attached to the negative (ground) side of the battery."
 
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