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Discussion Starter #1
Got about 550 hours on my 2005 Mule 610 with original drive belt. Got a new toy for it (small homemade box blade for gravel) and after using it noticed a faint rubber smell coming from under the dump bed. Now every time I drive the mule I get a wiff of it but it runs fine. Drivebelt possibly? I have a factory manual for the mule and the procedure does not look bad except for all the specialty tools it says you need $$$.
Is it possible to do it without the tools or easily fabricate your own. It looks like the tools are mainly to hold things so you can undue and tighten the nuts/bolts. How bad is it to do this yourself if you are an old dude who worked on lots of old cars most of his life馃懘
 

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Kawasaki Mule 550, KAF-300-C5
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the 610 belt set up is nearly the same as mine, all i did was remove about 10 5/16" screws, take the cover off, cut the old belt off, installed a new belt, i put it on the engine pulley first, then start it on the trans pulley and spin the pulley to roll the belt on.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the help. I am hoping it is that easy but may not have to find out yet. After looking at everything closer the rubber smell was coming from a piece of bungee cord that had fallen on the exhaust and melted. I got to admit the mule has given me little trouble so far. At one point I was having such a hard time with the carburetor I just bought a new one. I have had a few other minor things but figure I am getting close to having to doing some of the more difficult maintenance. I have hauled tons of rock, dirt and firewood with it over the years.
 

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Kawasaki Mule 550, KAF-300-C5
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my drive belt had over 1,000 hrs on it. i replaced it with a gates belt, just 'because'
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well that makes me feel better. When I first bought the mule new I was not that impressed with it's 4x4 capabilities. I live in the Blue Ridge Mountains with lots of steep terrain. Then I got smart and ditched the turf tires it came with. Bought some very aggressive mud bug type tires for the front and rear. Made all the difference in the world. No problem now in mud and snow and steep grades. I have even moved boulders I can't move by hand around the property by rolling them on a homemade sled and dragging them with the mule to where I want them.
 
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